Published On: August 3ʳᵈ, 2020 08:22

Security Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Amsterdam 17.3.x (Catalyst 9500 Switches)

Restrictions for CoPP

Restrictions for control plane policing (CoPP) include the following:

  • Only ingress CoPP is supported. The system-cpp-policy policy-map is available on the control plane interface, and only in the ingress direction. 


  • Only the system-cpp-policy policy-map can be installed on the control plane interface.

  • The system-cpp-policy policy-map and the system-defined classes cannot be modified or deleted.

  • Only the police action is allowed under the system-cpp-policy policy-map. The police rate for system-defined classes must be configured only in packets per second (pps).

  • One or more CPU queues are part of each class-map. Where multiple CPU queues belong to one class-map, changing the policer rate of a class-map affects all CPU queues that belong to that class-map. Similarly, disabling the policer in a class-map disables all queues that belong to that class-map. See Table: System-Defined Values for CoPP for information about which CPU queues belong to each class-map.

  • We recommend not disabling the policer for a system-defined class map, that is, do not configure no police rate rate pps command. Doing so affects the overall system health in case of high traffic towards the CPU. Further, even if you disable the policer rate for a system-defined class map, the systems automatically reverts to the default policer rate after system bootup in order to protect the system bring-up process.

  • The show run command does not display information about classes configured under system-cpp policy, when they are left at default values. Use the show policy-map system-cpp-policy or the show policy-map control-plane commands instead.

    You can continue use the show run command to display information about custom policies.

  • A protocol with a huge number of CPU-bound packets may impact other protocols in the same class, as some of these protocols share the same policer. For example, Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) shares 4000 hardware policers with an array of host protocols like Telnet, Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), SSH, FTP, and SNMP in the system-cpp-police-forus class. If there is an ARP poisoning or an ICMP attack, hardware policers start throttling any incoming traffic that exceeds 4000 packets per second to protect the CPU and the overall integrity of the system. As a result, ARP and ICMP host protocols are dropped, along with any other host protocols that share the same class.

  • Starting from Cisco IOS XE Fuji 16.8.1a, the creation of user-defined class-maps is not supported.

Information About CoPP

This chapter describes how control plane policing (CoPP) works on your device and how to configure it.

CoPP Overview

The CoPP feature improves security on your device by protecting the CPU from unnecessary traffic and denial of service (DoS) attacks. It can also protect control traffic and management traffic from traffic drops caused by high volumes of other, lower priority traffic.

Your device is typically segmented into three planes of operation, each with its own objective:

  • The data plane, to forward data packets.

  • The control plane, to route data correctly.

  • The management plane, to manage network elements.

You can use CoPP to protect most of the CPU-bound traffic and ensure routing stability, reachability, and packet delivery. Most importantly, you can use CoPP to protect the CPU from a DoS attack.

CoPP uses the modular QoS command-line interface (MQC) and CPU queues to achieve these objectives. Different types of control plane traffic are grouped together based on certain criteria, and assigned to a CPU queue. You can manage these CPU queues by configuring dedicated policers in hardware. For example, you can modify the policer rate for certain CPU queues (traffic-type), or you can disable the policer for a certain type of traffic.

Although the policers are configured in hardware, CoPP does not affect CPU performance or the performance of the data plane. But since it limits the number of packets going to CPU, the CPU load is controlled. This means that services waiting for packets from hardware may see a more controlled rate of incoming packets (the rate being user-configurable).

System-Defined Aspects of CoPP

When you power-up the device for the first time, the system automatically performs the following tasks:

  • Looks for policy-map system-cpp-policy . If not found, the system creates and installs it on the control-plane.

  • Creates eighteen class-maps under system-cpp-policy .

    The next time you power-up the device, the system detects the policy and class maps that have already been created.

  • Enables all CPU queues by default, with their respective default rate. The default rates are indicated in the table System-Defined Values for CoPP.

The system-cpp-policy policy map is a system-default policy map, and normally, you do not have to expressly save it to the startup configuration of the device. But, a failed bulk synchronization with a standby device can result in the configuration being erased from the startup configuration. In case this happens, you have to manually save the system-cpp-policy policy map to the startup configuration. Use the show running-config privileged EXEC command to verify that it has been saved:
policy-map system-cpp-policy

The following table lists the class-maps that the system creates when you load the device. It lists the policer that corresponds to each class-map and one or more CPU queues that are grouped under each class-map. There is a one-to-one mapping of class-maps to policers; and one or more CPU queues map to a class-map.

Table 1. System-Defined Values for CoPP

Class Maps Names

Policer Index (Policer No.)

CPU queues (Queue No.)

Default Policer Rate (pps)

system-cpp- police-data

WK_CPP_POLICE_DATA(0)

WK_CPU_Q_ICMP_GEN(3)

WK_CPU_Q_BROADCAST(12)

WK_CPU_Q_ICMP_REDIRECT (6)

600

600

600

system-cpp-police-l2- control

WK_CPP_POLICE_L2_ CONTROL(1)

WK_CPU_Q_L2_CONTROL(1)

2000

system-cpp-police-routing-control

WK_CPP_POLICE_ROUTING_CONTROL(2)

WK_CPU_Q_ROUTING_CONTROL(4)

WK_CPU_Q_LOW_LATENCY (27)

5400

5400

system-cpp-police-punt-webauth

WK_CPP_POLICE_PU NT_WEBAUTH(7)

WK_CPU_Q_PUNT_WEBAUTH(22)

1000

system-cpp-police- topology-control

WK_CPP_POLICE_TOPOLOGY_CONTROL(8)

WK_CPU_Q_TOPOLOGY_CONTROL(15)

13000

system-cpp-police- multicast

WK_CPP_POLICE_MULTICAST(9)

WK_CPU_Q_TRANSIT_TRAFFIC(18)

WK_CPU_Q_MCAST_DATA(30)

500

500

system-cpp-police-sys- data

WK_CPP_POLICE_SYS _DATA (10)

WK_CPU_Q_OPENFLOW (13)

WK_CPU_Q_CRYPTO_CONTROL(23)

WK_CPU_Q_EXCEPTION(24)

WK_CPU_Q_EGR_EXCEPTION(28)

WK_CPU_Q_NFL_SAMPLED_DATA(26)

WK_CPU_Q_GOLD_PKT(31)

WK_CPU_Q_RPF_FAILED(19)

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

system-cpp-police-dot1x-auth

WK_CPP_POLICE_DOT1X(11)

WK_CPU_Q_DOT1X_AUTH(0)

1000

system-cpp-police- protocol-snooping

WK_CPP_POLICE_PR

WK_CPU_Q_PROTO_SNOOPING(16)

2000

system-cpp-police-dhcp-snooping

WK_CPP_DHCP_SNOOPING

WK_CPU_Q_DHCP_SNOOPING(17)

500

system-cpp-police-sw-forward

WK_CPP_POLICE_SW_FWD (13)

WK_CPU_Q_SW_FORWARDING_Q(14)

WK_CPU_Q_LOGGING(21)

WK_CPU_Q_L2_LVX_DATA_PACK (11)

1000

1000

1000

system-cpp-police-forus

WK_CPP_POLICE_FORUS(14)

WK_CPU_Q_FORUS_ADDR_RESOLUTION(5)

WK_CPU_Q_FORUS_TRAFFIC(2)

4000

4000

system-cpp-police- multicast-end-station

WK_CPP_POLICE_MULTICAST_SNOOPING(15)

WK_CPU_Q_MCAST_END_STA TION_SERVICE(20)

2000

system-cpp-default

WK_CPP_POLICE_DEFAULT_POLICER

WK_CPU_Q_INTER_FED_TRAFFIC

WK_CPU_Q_EWLC_CONTROL(9)

WK_CPU_Q_EWLC_DATA(10)

2000

2000

2000

system-cpp-police-stackwise-virt-control

WK_CPP_STACKWISE_VIRTUAL_CONTROL

WK_CPU_Q_STACKWISE_VIRTUAL_CONTROL (29)

8000

system-cpp-police-l2lvx-control

WK_CPP_ L2_LVX_CONT_PACK

WK_CPU_Q_L2_LVX_CONT_PACK(8)

1000

system-cpp-police-high-rate-app

WK_CPP_HIGH_RATE_APP

WK_CPU_Q_HIGH_RATE_APP

13000

system-cpp-police-system-critical

WK_CPP_SYSTEM_CRITICAL

WK_CPU_Q_SYSTEM_CRITICAL

1000

User-Configurable Aspects of CoPP

You can perform these tasks to manage control plane traffic:


Note
All system-cpp-policy configurations must be saved so they are retained after reboot.

Enable or Disable a Policer for CPU Queues

Enable a policer for a CPU queue, by configuring a policer action (in packets per second) under the corresponding class-map, within the system-cpp-policy policy-map.

Disable a policer for CPU queue, by removing the policer action under the corresponding class-map, within the system-cpp-policy policy-map.


Note

If a default policer is already present, carefully consider and control its removal; otherwise the system may see a CPU hog or other anomalies, such as control packet drops.


Change the Policer Rate

You can do this by configuring a policer rate action (in packets per second), under the corresponding class-map, within thesystem-cpp-policy policy-map.

When setting a policer rate, note that the rate you set is automatically converted to the nearest multiple of 200. For instance, if you set the policer rate of a CPU queue 100 pps, the system changes it to 200; or if set the policer rate to 650, the system changes it to 600. See Example: Setting the Default Policer Rates for All CPU Queues in this chapter, for sample output that displays this behavior.

Set Policer Rates to Default

Set the policer for CPU queues to their default values, by entering the cpp system-default command in global configuration mode.

Upgrading or Downgrading the Software Version

Software Version Upgrades and CoPP

When you upgrade the software version on your device, the system checks and make the necessary updates as required for CoPP (For instance, it checks for the system-cpp-policy policy map and creates it if missing). You may also have to complete certain tasks before or after the upgrade activity. This is to ensure that any configuration updates are reflected correctly and CoPP continues to work as expected. Depending on the method you use to upgrade the software, upgrade-related tasks may be optional or recommended in some scenarios, and mandatory in others.

The system actions and user actions for an upgrade, are described here. Also included, are any release-specfic caveats.

System Actions for an Upgrade

When you upgrade the software version on your device, the system performs these actions. This applies to all upgrade methods:

  • If the device did not have a system-cpp-policy policy map before upgrade, then on upgrade, the system creates a default policy map.

  • If the device had a system-cpp-policy policy map before upgrade, then on upgrade, the system does not re-generate the policy.

User Actions for an Upgrade

User actions for an upgrade – depending on upgrade method:

Upgrade Method

Condition

Action Time and Action

Purpose

Regular1

None

After upgrade (required)

Enter the cpp system-default command in global configuration mode

To get the latest, default policer rates.

In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU)2

If there are user-defined classes in the existing software version

or

If there are system-defined classes in the existing software version that are deprecated in a later release (for example: system-cpp-police-control-low-priority).

Before and after upgrade (required)

Enter the cpp system-default command in global configuration mode

Enter the command before upgrade, to ensure that any required system configuration is updated, ensuring smooth ISSU operation.

Enter the command after upgrade for the latest, default policer rates.

1 Refers to a software upgrade method that involves a reload of the switch. Can be install or bundle mode.
2 ISSU is supported only from one extended maintenance release to another. For more information, see In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU).

Software Version Downgrades and CoPP

The system actions and user actions for a downgrade, are described here.

System Actions for a Downgrade

When you downgrade the software version on your device, the system performs these actions. This applies to all downgrade methods:

  • The system retains the system-cpp-policy policy map on the device, and installs it on the control plane.

User Actions for a Downgrade

User actions for a downgrade:

Upgrade Method

Condition

Action Time and Action

Purpose

Regular3

None

No action required

Not applicable

In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU)4

None

No action required

Not applicable

3 Refers to a software upgrade method that involves a reload of the switch. Can be install or bundle mode.
4 ISSU downgrades are not supported.

If you downgrade the software version and then upgrade, the system action and user actions that apply are the same as those mentioned for upgrades.

How to Configure CoPP

Enabling a CPU Queue or Changing the Policer Rate

The procedure to enable a CPU queue and change the policer rate of a CPU queue is the same. Follow these steps:

Procedure

  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1

enable

Example:


Device> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

Example:


Device# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:


Device(config)# policy-map system-cpp-policy
Device(config-pmap)#

Enters the policy map configuration mode.

Step 4

class class-name

Example:


Device(config-pmap)# class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping
Device(config-pmap-c)#

Enters the class action configuration mode. Enter the name of the class that corresponds to the CPU queue you want to enable. See table System-Defined Values for CoPP.

Step 5

police rate rate pps

Example:


Device(config-pmap-c)# police rate 100 pps
Device(config-pmap-c-police)#

Specifies an upper limit on the number of incoming packets processed per second, for the specified traffic class.

Note 
The rate you specify is applied to all CPU queues that belong to the class-map you have specified.
Step 6

exit

Example:


Device(config-pmap-c-police)# exit
Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
Device(config-pmap)# exit 
Device(config)#

Returns to the global configuration mode.

Step 7

control-plane

Example:


Device(config)# control-plane
Device(config-cp)#

Enters the control plane (config-cp) configuration mode

Step 8

service-policy input policy-name

Example:


Device(config)# control-plane
Device(config-cp)#service-policy input system-cpp-policy
Device(config-cp)#

Installs system-cpp-policy in FED. This command is required for you to see the FED policy. Not configuring this command will lead to an error.

Step 9

end

Example:


Device(config-cp)# end

Returns to the privileged EXEC mode.

Step 10

show policy-map control-plane

Example:

Device# show policy-map control-plane

Displays all the classes configured under system-cpp policy, the rates configured for the various traffic types, and statistics

Disabling a CPU Queue

Follow these steps to disable a CPU queue:

Procedure

  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1

enable

Example:


Device> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

Example:


Device# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:


Device(config)# policy-map system-cpp-policy
Device(config-pmap)#

Enters the policy map configuration mode.

Step 4

class class-name

Example:


Device(config-pmap)# class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping
Device(config-pmap-c)#

Enters the class action configuration mode. Enter the name of the class that corresponds to the CPU queue you want to disable. See the table, System-Defined Values for CoPP.

Step 5

no police rate rate pps

Example:


Device(config-pmap-c)# no police rate 100 pps


Disables incoming packet processing for the specified traffic class.

Note 
This disables all CPU queues that belong to the class-map you have specified.
Step 6

end

Example:


Device(config-pmap-c)# end


Returns to the privileged EXEC mode.

Step 7

show policy-map control-plane

Example:


Device# show policy-map control-plane

Displays all the classes configured under system-cpp policy and the rates configured for the various traffic types and statistics.

Setting the Default Policer Rates for All CPU Queues

Follow these steps to set the policer rates for all CPU queues to their default rates:

Procedure

  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1

enable

Example:


Device> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2

configure terminal

Example:


Device# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3

cpp system-default

Example:


Device(config)# cpp system-default
Defaulting CPP : Policer rate for all classes will be set to their defaults


Sets the policer rates for all the classes to the default rate.

Step 4

end

Example:


Device(config)# end


Returns to the privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5

show platform hardware fed switch{ switch-number | active | standby} qos que stats internal cpu policer

Example:


Device# show platform hardware fed switch 1 qos que stat internal cpu policer


Displays the rates configured for the various traffic types.

Configuration Examples for CoPP

Example: Enabling a CPU Queue or Changing the Policer Rate of a CPU Queue

This example shows how to enable a CPU queue or to change the policer rate of a CPU queue. Here the class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping CPU queue is enabled with the policer rate of 2000 pps .


Device> enable
Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# policy-map system-cpp-policy
Device(config-pmap)# class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping
Device(config-pmap-c)# police rate 2000 pps
Device(config-pmap-c-police)# end


Device# show policy-map control-plane

Control Plane 

  Service-policy input: system-cpp-policy

    <output truncated>

          
    Class-map: system-cpp-police-dot1x-auth (match-any)  
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: none 
      police:
          rate 1000 pps, burst 244 packets
        conformed 0 bytes; actions:
          transmit 
        exceeded 0 bytes; actions:
          drop 
          
    Class-map: system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping (match-any)  
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: none 
      police:
          rate 2000 pps, burst 488 packets
        conformed 0 bytes; actions:
          transmit 
        exceeded 0 bytes; actions:
          drop 
          
    <output truncated>
    
    Class-map: class-default (match-any)  
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: any 


Example: Disabling a CPU Queue

This example shows how to disable a CPU queue. Here the class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping CPU queue is disabled.


Device> enable
Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# policy-map system-cpp-policy
Device(config-pmap)# class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping
Device(config-pmap-c)# no police rate 100 pps
Device(config-pmap-c)# end


Device# show running-config | begin system-cpp-policy

policy-map system-cpp-policy
 class system-cpp-police-data
  police rate 200 pps
 class system-cpp-police-sys-data
  police rate 100 pps
 class system-cpp-police-sw-forward
  police rate 1000 pps
 class system-cpp-police-multicast
  police rate 500 pps
 class system-cpp-police-multicast-end-station
  police rate 2000 pps
 class system-cpp-police-punt-webauth
 class system-cpp-police-l2-control
 class system-cpp-police-routing-control
  police rate 500 pps
 class system-cpp-police-control-low-priority
 class system-cpp-police-wireless-priority1
 class system-cpp-police-wireless-priority2
 class system-cpp-police-wireless-priority3-4-5
 class system-cpp-police-topology-control
 class system-cpp-police-dot1x-auth
 class system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping
 class system-cpp-police-forus
 class system-cpp-default

<output truncated>

Example: Setting the Default Policer Rates for All CPU Queues

This example shows how to set the policer rates for all CPU queues to their default and then verify the setting.


Note

For some CPU queues, the default rate and the set rate values will not be the same, even if you set the default rate for all classes. This because the set rate is rounded off to the nearest multiple of 200. This behavior is controlled by the clock speed of your device. In the sample output below, the default and set rate values for DHCP Snooping and NFL SAMPLED DATA display this difference.

Device> enable
Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# cpp system-default
Defaulting CPP : Policer rate for all classes will be set to their defaults
Device(config)# end


Device# show platform hardware fed switch 1 qos queue stats internal cpu policer
CPU Queue Statistics                  
============================================================================================
                                              (default) (set)     Queue        Queue
QId PlcIdx  Queue Name                Enabled   Rate     Rate      Drop(Bytes)  Drop(Frames)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0    11     DOT1X Auth                  Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
1    1      L2 Control                  Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
2    14     Forus traffic               Yes     4000      4000     0            0          
3    0      ICMP GEN                    Yes     600       600      0            0          
4    2      Routing Control             Yes     5400      5400     0            0          
5    14     Forus Address resolution    Yes     4000      4000     0            0          
6    0      ICMP Redirect               Yes     600       600      0            0          
7    16     Inter FED Traffic           Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
8    4      L2 LVX Cont Pack            Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
9    16     EWLC Control                Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
10   16     EWLC Data                   Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
11   13     L2 LVX Data Pack            Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
12   0      BROADCAST                   Yes     600       600      0            0          
13   10     Openflow                    Yes     100       200      0            0          
14   13     Sw forwarding               Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
15   8      Topology Control            Yes     13000     13000    0            0          
16   12     Proto Snooping              Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
17   6      DHCP Snooping               Yes     500       400      0            0          
18   9      Transit Traffic             Yes     500       400      0            0          
19   10     RPF Failed                  Yes     100       200      0            0          
20   15     MCAST END STATION           Yes     2000      2000     0            0          
21   13     LOGGING                     Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
22   7      Punt Webauth                Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
23   18     High Rate App               Yes     13000     13000    0            0          
24   10     Exception                   Yes     100       200      0            0          
25   3      System Critical             Yes     1000      1000     0            0          
26   10     NFL SAMPLED DATA            Yes     100       200      0            0          
27   2      Low Latency                 Yes     5400      5400     0            0          
28   10     EGR Exception               Yes     100       200      0            0          
29   5      Stackwise Virtual OOB       Yes     8000      8000     0            0          
30   9      MCAST Data                  Yes     500       400      0            0          
31   10     Gold Pkt                    Yes     100       200      0            0          
          
* NOTE: CPU queue policer rates are configured to the closest hardware supported value
          
                      CPU Queue Policer Statistics               
====================================================================
Policer    Policer Accept   Policer Accept  Policer Drop  Policer Drop
  Index         Bytes          Frames        Bytes          Frames
-------------------------------------------------------------------
0          0                0               0             0          
1          0                0               0             0          
2          0                0               0             0          
3          0                0               0             0          
4          0                0               0             0          
5          0                0               0             0          
6          0                0               0             0          
7          0                0               0             0          
8          0                0               0             0          
9          0                0               0             0          
10         0                0               0             0          
11         0                0               0             0          
12         0                0               0             0          
13         0                0               0             0          
14         0                0               0             0          
15         0                0               0             0          
16         0                0               0             0          
17         0                0               0             0          
18         0                0               0             0          
          
                        CPP Classes to queue map 
======================================================================================
PlcIdx CPP Class                                :  Queues
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0      system-cpp-police-data                   :  ICMP GEN/BROADCAST/ICMP Redirect/
10     system-cpp-police-sys-data               :  Openflow/Exception/EGR Exception/NFL SAMPLED DATA/Gold Pkt/RPF Failed/
13     system-cpp-police-sw-forward             :  Sw forwarding/LOGGING/L2 LVX Data Pack/
9      system-cpp-police-multicast              :  Transit Traffic/MCAST Data/
15     system-cpp-police-multicast-end-station  :  MCAST END STATION /
7      system-cpp-police-punt-webauth           :  Punt Webauth/
1      system-cpp-police-l2-control             :  L2 Control/
2      system-cpp-police-routing-control        :  Routing Control/Low Latency/
3      system-cpp-police-system-critical        :  System Critical/
4      system-cpp-police-l2lvx-control          :  L2 LVX Cont Pack/
8      system-cpp-police-topology-control       :  Topology Control/
11     system-cpp-police-dot1x-auth             :  DOT1X Auth/
12     system-cpp-police-protocol-snooping      :  Proto Snooping/
6      system-cpp-police-dhcp-snooping          :  DHCP Snooping/
14     system-cpp-police-forus                  :  Forus Address resolution/Forus traffic/
5      system-cpp-police-stackwise-virt-control :  Stackwise Virtual OOB/
16     system-cpp-default                       :  Inter FED Traffic/EWLC Control/EWLC Data/
18     system-cpp-police-high-rate-app          :  High Rate App/

Monitoring CoPP

Use these commands to display policer settings, such as, traffic types and policer rates (user-configured and default rates) for CPU queues:

Command

Purpose

show policy-map control-plane

Displays the rates configured for the various traffic types

show policy-map system-cpp-policy

Displays all the classes configured under system-cpp policy, and policer rates

show platform hardware fed switch{ switch-number| active| standby} qos que stats internal cpu policer

Displays the rates configured for the various traffic types

show platform software fed { switch-number| active| standby} qos policy target status

Displays information about policy status and the target port type.

Additional References for CoPP

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

Technical Assistance

Description

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Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Feature Information for CoPP

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Feature

Release

Feature Information

Control Plane Policing (CoPP) or CPP

Cisco IOS XE Everest 16.5.1a

This feature was introduced.

The CoPP feature improves security on your device by protecting the CPU from unnecessary traffic, or DoS traffic, and by prioritizing control plane and management traffic.

The feature provides CLI configuration options to enable and disable CPU queues, to change the policer rate, set policer rates to default, and to create user-defined class-maps.

Change in the system behavior for policer rates that are set.

Cisco IOS XE Everest 16.6.4

For some CPU queues, the default rate and the set rate values will not be the same, even if you set the default rate for all classes. This because the set rate is rounded off to the nearest multiple of 200.

Removal of support for user-defined class-maps and changes in system-defined values for CoPP

Cisco IOS XE Fuji 16.8.1a

  • Starting from this release, the creation of user-defined class-maps is not supported.

  • This new system-defined class was introduced: system-cpp-police-dhcp-snooping

  • This new CPU queue was added to the existing system-cpp-default class: WK_CPU_Q_INTER_FED_TRAFFIC

  • These CPU queues are no longer available:

    • WK_CPU_Q_SHOW_FORWARD

    • WK_CPU_Q_UNUSED

  • The default policer rate (pps) for some CPU queues has changed:

    • The default rate for WK_CPU_Q_EXCEPTION(24) was changed to 100

    • The default rate for all the CPU queues under system-cpp-default was increased to 2000.

    • The default rate for all the CPU queues under system-cpp-police-forus was increased to 4000.

  • The feature was introduced on the High Performance models in the series.

    All Cisco IOS XE Fuji 16.8.1a release changes apply to all models in the series.

Changes in system-defined values for CoPP

Cisco IOS XE Fuji 16.9.1

Starting with this release, eighteen system-defined classes are created under system-cpp-policy.

These new system-defined classes were introduced:

  • system-cpp-police-high-rate-app

  • system-cpp-police-system-critical

This was added to class system-cpp-police-sys- data: CPU queue WK_CPU_Q_OPENFLOW (13).

This CPU queue is no longer available: WK_CPU_Q_LEARNING_CACHE_OVFL(13).

Deprecation of system-defined class map

Cisco IOS XE Fuji 16.9.4

This system-defined class map was deprecated: system-cpp-police-control-low-priority